Militaires d'Haiti. (ca.1795 to 1995).

Prepared & maintained by Emmanuel Ardouin & Frankie Morone.

The historic pictures were obtained by Frankie Morone on various websites. The others are courtesy of Professor Ernst & his son Bob Danache, Grégoire Dadompré, Francky Jn. Baptiste, Edouard Boucicaut & Jean-Pierre Cloutier. Anyone who wants to contribute to this album can send pictures jpeg format to: pikliz@pikliz.com. Prepared and maintained by Manny Ardouin: eardouin@hotmail.com

Narration by Frankie Morone.

The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) is the most successful slave rebellions in the Western Hemisphere. It established Haiti as a free country ruled by blacks and mulattoes. At the time of the revolution, Haiti was known as Saint-Domingue the most prosperous colony of France. That is why it was called " La perle des antilles". Through the revolution, people of African ancestry (mostly) freed themselves from French colonization and from slavery. Although several rebellions took place during that era, only the revolt at Saint-Domingue, beginning in Aug.1791, succeeded in permanently liberating an entire island. Twenty years earlier Vincent Ogé and Jn Baptiste Chavannes tried to fight for certain rights for the slaves; they failed and paid a hefty price.

The Battle of Vertières, took place on November 18, 1803. It was fought between the Haitian army led by Jean - Jacques Dessalines and the French colonial army under the command of Rochambeau. The new nation of Haiti had an army in the real sense of the word.

It was until the American Occupation (1915-1934) that the Marines under the order of the US Government created a different type of Haitian Army. That "Haitian army" was probably one of the surest and staunchest allies of the United States in Haiti . At the beginning it did some police work. The Haitian army was always able to deliver a coup d’état with the tacit and sometimes overt or covert approval of the US. Presidents Lescot & Estime were overthrown by the army.

Almost everyone would agree that the army has had a difficult history in Haiti and sometimes a negative impact on the country’s political process.

François Duvalier himself was afraid of that army. He knew that he could easily be forced into exile by that same army who ten years earlier forced Estime out. This is unquestionably why he created the VSN and the Tontons Macoutes a paramilitary force that would be able to face that army in an eventual coup d' etat attempt. He also had executed many officers in the army in the early 1960’s. He believed that they were potential coup d’état organizers. Several of these officers were of courses innocent. He acted irrationally and hastily. One also has to remember the position of Juan Bosh (the Dominican president vis a vis him.) They were bitter enemies.

Then later Prosper Avril, Henry Namphy left their marks on the army. No need to elaborate on that.

In 1991, Aristide was forced out. The army under General Raoul Cédras overthrew him in coup d' etat. Few years later,under pressure from the US (President Clinton), General Raoul Cedras and his acolytes had to leave Haiti in order for the duly elected president Aristide to return. It was then that Aristide gave the "coup de grace" to the army by dismantling it. (Again not the devil advocate that is understandable)

The role of an army is to protect the territorial integrity of a country, its people as well as its economy.

We invite to browse this album and enjoy these pictures.They are on the site to entertain and inform only.

Our staff has their personal view on a variety of subjects.

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  • Pikliz.com Premium user United States (Private)
    5 years 3 months ago
    Etienne Elie Gérin. (one of the MASTERMIND of Jn. Jacques Dessalines' assassination.)
    Hello Veyatif;

    It is always good practice to clearly identify yourself when providing valuable information. You leave us undecided on whether or not these are authentic when "anonymous". Un peu de courage. Any way, Thank you. ((Manny Ardouin))
  • Veyatif (Private)
    5 years 3 months ago
    Etienne Elie Gérin. (one of the MASTERMIND of Jn. Jacques Dessalines' assassination.)
    Petion was a staunch black opponent. He was consistently in the way of black advancement. He fought Toussaint during the civil war, trying to block black advancement. He came back with the French expedition, trying to block black advancement. He plotted to remove Dessalines, thereby blocking black advancement. He may have been, along with Boyer a secret agent of France. When France asked Haiti to pay an indemnity to the colonists, I still do not beleive that Boyer did not ask France to pay an indemnity for the forced and free work of 450000 slaves for 150 years. This guy must have been a French agent.
  • pikliz (Private)
    5 years 5 months ago
    General Raoul Cedras
    Merci anonymous pour la visite.On a fouille un peu partout et on n' a pas pu trouver une photo de Yves Volel. C' est bien dommage qu' il ait perdu sa vie dans de telles conditions. Bon courage.
  • (Anonymously) (Private)
    5 years 5 months ago
    General Raoul Cedras
    bonjour ,voulez vous mettre une photo de Yves Volel en uniforme militaire??j'etais moureuse de lui quand j etais adolescente
    merci
  • 5 years 6 months ago
    Charles Turnier.
    l'homme qui a fait l'histoire et, pionnier dans la resistance contre les mauvais genies et vagabonds du pays,, L'un des hero du temp, Hero de la famille, Vive notre cher Haiti elle ne tombera jamais
  • (Anonymously) (Private)
    5 years 8 months ago
    General Raoul Cedras
    Voici un Jeremien
  • La Lionne (Private)
    5 years 9 months ago
    Vincent Ogé.
    Vincent Ogé, est né au Dondon en 1768. Fils d’une riche famille, il est le promoteur de la première insurrection armée des affranchis(mulatres) de Saint-Domingue (Haiti 29 Octobre 1790). C’était le fils d’un Blanc établi au Cap-Français et d’une mulâtresse libre, propriétaire d’une caféterie au Dondon. Homme brillant, Ogé a reçu L’essentiel de son éducation à Bordeaux en France, après quoi il entra au service d’un prince allemand. Le 8 Septembre 1779, Vincent Ogé, participa à la guerre d’Indépendance américaine dans le bataillon des Chasseurs Volontaires au côté d’autres hommes de couleur, parmi lesquels André Rigaud, Jean-Baptiste Chavannes, Villatte, Louis Jacques Beauvais, Laurent Férou, Julien Raimond, Mars Belley, Martial Besse, et Henry Christophe dirigés par le compte d'Estaing.
  • Ed Boucicaut (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Bubu,
    Thank you for your answer, do agree the the change of the constitution had many ramifications. To me the greatest damage done by Duvalier, second to thousands killed was the vacuum created when a good part of the middle class and lots of intellectuals left the country in the 60's. We are still feeling the effects, education, health, government and the country structures are ruined.
  • 5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Well Bubu,
    First would really like to know your real name ? Sec., you mentioned F. Duvalier was consolidating his power ? What exactly do you mean by that ?

    Remenber the history that brought Duvalier to power, after Lescot, there wast a class division in the country. Then came Estime, who called on a Unified nation to go forward, then came Magloire, who ousted Estime, during that time. Many intellectuals and military personels, look to Duvalier to bring back the hope they had with Estime. Remember Duvalier's caimpaign slogangs, were he will continue what Estime started.

    Those are the reasons why most of the young military in the 50's including my father supported Duvalier. He turned against the ones who put him in power.
  • Bubu (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Edouard,

    Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my comment. This part of the Francois Duvalier's reign is very interesting as he was consolidating his power. I remember vaguely that morning when rumors were circulating in Port-au-Prince about the whereabouts of your father.

    You know, there is always 2 sides of a story. I do not dispute the fact that he resigned as Chief of Staff of the army. Knowing Francois, he probably would have killed him had he found out that your dad had the intention to overthrow his regime. Duvalier trusted no one. I am sure(as you mentioned in your last sentence) Duvalier distorted the events to for his own political gain.

    I did not intent to be derogatory by using the term "fired". Take care!
  • Bubu (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Edouard,
    That is very nice of you to share that picture with the viewers of Pikliz and I commend you for that (by the way this is a historic picture). I wish we were able to get more. One question I would like to ask you: Did your father resign as you mentioned in your comment & why or was he perhaps about to be fired so to speak by Francois Duvalier? Would you be kind enough to shed some light on this very interesting part of history. Thanks.
  • Manny (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Interesting....Thanks
  • Edouard Boucicaut (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Manny,
    Since very young, was always intrigued by the military and my father's involvent in it. Used to polish his medals, prepare his uniforms for parades coming up, attending F.A.D.H.'s manouvers etc.

    One night while in the Venezuelan embassy in P.au P. when my father and our family took refuge after his resignation as Chief of staff, he had a visitor.

    Clement Barbeau, broke though the macoute security watching the embassy and came in to talk to my father. I hid so I could listen in. Barbeau was telling my father of his plan to kidnap Jn. Claude to force Duvalier to leave as ransom. My father's response to him was " if you fail , hurt or kill him, Duvalier will murder school children and not relenquish his power". Barbot responded than it was a perfect plan and will not fail.

    It failed and the rifle team and F.A.D.H. paid the price.
  • Manny (Private)
    5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Ed how was Barbot involved in this? This is like a history class. By the way thanks for all the info.
  • 5 years 10 months ago
    1960 F.A.D.H. Rifle Team
    Manny,
    To add to your description of this picture. there is a lot of history there. The F.A.D.H. was considered in the Americas as a rag time army . These young men under the leadership of Lt. Col. Rene Leon and the training by CWO Davis & Sgt. Bushey won 2nd. place in the America's armies shooting tournement in Panama, second to the US rifle team.

    When Clement Barbeau try to kidnap Jn. Claude Duvalier in College Bird, a macoute called Rodrigue toll Francois Duvalier that it was Barbeau who tried to do it. Duvalier then used that event to continue his purge of the F.A.D.H. by stating only a " franc tireur" could pull this off.

    Toll: Ben Benoit lost his parents and a son, Claude Edeline lost some parents, Guy Marcel lost his life, a number of officers and enlisted were killed that day. Do not know the fate of the NCOs of the team. As a young man, I used to go watch them train with my father, these men always held a special place in me, achieve what was not expected of them and ending up paying the ultimate price for their sucess for their country